JCCP Backs Medics-Only Approach to Injectables

The Joint Council of Cosmetic Practitioners (JCCP) has set out its stall in the debate regarding who should be allowed to practice aesthetic medicine in the UK. The industry body has announced it backs the medics-only approach to injectables.

This is the logical, patient safety-centred position we at Harley Academy have championed since our inception. 

It’s the reason our founder, Dr Tristan Mehta, conceived the Level 7 injectables qualification seven years ago. And it’s the reason our current Ofqual-regulated, top tier qualification, the Level 7 Diploma in Botox and Dermal Fillers and its Fast Track option exist. 

We are happy to have the JCCP and its sister organisation, the Cosmetic Practice Standards Authority (CPSA), aligned with us on this.

Lip Filler Medics-Only Approach to Injectables - Aesthetic Medicine Training Courses Harley Academy

Position in the “interests of patient safety and public protection”

In a statement dated 4th May 2022, the JCCP and the CPSA confirmed their joint position. You can read the full statement on the JCCP’s website. However, we have extracted the section relating to injectables, below.

The JCCP and CPSA say:

“After a lengthy period of discussion with practitioners, consumers, patients, stakeholders and politicians we have concluded that in the interests of patient safety and public protection, high-risk and potentially harmful procedures, such as the insertion of dermal fillers or the injection of toxins should only be administered by appropriately trained healthcare professionals.”

JCCP AND CPSA STATEMENT aesthetics regulation Harley Academy injectables training courses Level 7

Harley Academy founder, Dr Tristan Mehta says of this update:

“In light of these announcements, this is good news that the JCCP has taken this position, which is that only healthcare professionals should be carrying out more invasive treatments, such as injectables. Of course, this is common sense to those who are already practising. But it’s an important signal for what the future could – and should – look like for the aesthetic landscape and the ultimate education requirements needed, which are very much in line with Harley Academy’s philosophy.”

Dr Tristan Mehta Aesthetics KOL Harley Academy Aesthetic Medicine Courses - Injectables Specialist - STORY Clinic London

Regulating the UK aesthetics industry

As the JCCP/CPSA statement highlights, injectables – both toxin and fillers – are high risk medical procedures. They should not be seen as beauty treatments. Therefore, it is only sensible and right that they should be carried out by licensed medics with specialist aesthetic medicine training

The UK is one of the only countries in the world where this is not currently the case. It does appear that headway is being made though, with statutory regulations believed to be in the works.

By publicising their position, the JCCP and CPSA are keeping the subject of aesthetics regulation at the forefront of people’s minds. The process of introducing statutory regulation to the largely unregulated UK aesthetics sector is a hot topic. It has been the subject of reports, consultations and recommendations for a number of years now. 

Health and Care Act 2022

New governmental steps are now eagerly awaited as they will form part of the new Health and Care Act 2022. This Bill received Royal Assent from the Queen on 22 April 2022, paving the way for meaningful change. The next wave of announcements will hopefully apprise the industry of forthcoming changes relating to:

– Clarification on who will be allowed to practice aesthetics in the UK; whether the specialism should be open to healthcare professionals only

– A minimum standard of education being set out for all aesthetics practitioners

– Further detail on the 2021 decision to require all aesthetic practitioners to hold a dedicated license in order to practice in the UK as part of the Health and Care Act 2022

– Whether dermal fillers will become a prescription medication

– Clamping down on remote prescribing of botulinum toxin

– Regulating aesthetics training providers and cracking down on rogue operations.

It does appear that meaningful progress is being made in this area. And, as pioneers and champions of this highly-trained, medics-only approach to injectables, we’ll keep you updated on all developments. 

In the meantime, whether you are looking to kickstart your aesthetics career or enhance your practise with formal injectables training and by becoming #HarleyTrained, contact our team. They’ll be happy to advise and guide you to your perfect training pathway and set you on the road to aesthetic excellence!

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